Archive for the ‘Babies’ Category

Infants as young as 3 months begin to instinctively categorize people based on their sex, skin color, and the language they speak. Between 5 and 10 months babies begin to learn about race based on experience. Furthermore, 3-5 year-olds not only categorize people by race but express bias based on it. Overcoming these types of inherent prejudice will take a proactive effort on your part, and it needs to start early, before your child’s opinions are fully formed.

Tolerance is an absolute necessity in our increasingly global and multicultural society. So-called racial and ethnic minorities now make up the mafority of children born in the U.S. By the year 2043, nearly half of the population will be people of color, according to recent Census projections. Our nation is becoming more diverse in other ways too. Islam and Mormonism are among America’s fastest growing religions. Same-sex marriage is legal in 37 states plus the District of Columbia. More than 35 million people now speak Spanish as their primary language at home. And our school system is increasingly placing children with disabilities in regular rather than specialized classrooms.

Today’s kids are going to have to interact with people from many backgrounds and cultures, as well as with those who do not look or act like they do. Celebrating diversity, not merely tolerating it, is going to be the key to their success. In our upcoming posts we will give you some steps you can take to teach your children how to be open-minded towards others.

Check out part one of this series of raising a respectful child. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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Not being able to see the smart board is bad enough, but over 80% of the sensory information kids receive also comes through sight. Three things that you need to know are:

You should not rely solely on the school nurse. The in-school screenings only identify about 5% of vision problems. Kids are often able to squint through a distance only screening.

Kids need checkups for vision and eye health. Eye exams catch rare but serious conditions like glaucoma and even signs of brain tumors. You should get vision screenings done at all well child visits from the time they are born until 3 years-old and annually between the ages of 3 and 5 and at least every 2 years after that.

Do not sweat Rx changes. A new prescription does not necessarily mean that your child’s vision is worsening. Kids’ eyes continue to grow and so vision continues to change, until about the age of 20. Think of new lenses like the need for a new pair of shoes.

Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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vision

A few ideas that may help you find your child more quickly.

ID Bracelet: Customize these bright disposable bracelets with your cell number and allergy/medical information.

Buddytag: These bracelets have a GPS tracker. A phone app tells you their whereabouts and alerts you if they go more than a specified distance away.

Temporary Tattoo: Write your cell number on one of these waterproof tattoos and paste it to your child’s arm.

Child ID Kit: Assemble one yourself with your child’s photo, height, weight, fingerprints and other identifying information to help law enforcement if ever necessary.

See critical information for other things to help you in an emergency. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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Once your child hits preschool, make reading a full multimedia experience. Teach your child that stories transcend the written word by acting out favorite tales together, listening to audio books and employing a few apps.

You are probably pointing out letters to your enthusiastic young pre-reader, but do not forget to highlight numbers while reading also. Ask math questions like: How many sandwiches did the bear eat? Help your child count on their fingers. You can also build comprehension skills by challenging kids to guess what will happen next in the story.

As they move into kindergarten and elementary school, children develop their own strong preferences. Pay close attention to what books your child responds to and what topics they are curious about. Use this as a launching point to connect them with new genres and explore even more. If your kids likes a particular drawing from a certain book, then introduce them to more drawings and books by that same author. Your child will realize that reading empowers them to make new discoveries.

Ready to help your child get lost in a book? Look at approved apps and tools and ideas from other authors. Check out the best books section for every type of reader. See more on critical reading. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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Raising

Mother and daughter reading book lying in bed

Ignite a can not put it down spark with our surefire picks and tips. Raise a kid who loves to read.

You have probably heard it before, but we will say it again: Reading makes kids smart. Engaging with kids books helps them excel in school. It will strengthen their vocabulary and spelling, as well as help them in math, science and reasoning skills. It gives them a sense of empathy, motivation and curiosity. I am sure you get the point. Reading is critical.

So now how do you get your kid hooked on reading books? Read to them, at least once a day. After that, the key is to be interactive. That means asking them a lot of questions, pointing out details for them in books and encouraging them to retell the story they read in their own words.

It is never too late to start. For little readers, make the experience tactile: Urge babies to touch and turn the pages. You can also mime actions, such as, eating and use toys for props.

As your child grows into the toddler years, identify colors and shapes on each page and then point them out in the world around you. Now is the time to start asking questions as well. (Where did the dog go? Why was Dad sad?) Help them relate to character’s emotions by asking them if they ever felt the same way.

Use your cutie’s love of imagination play to your advantage by visiting the library and making it a game at home. Stamp books and scan a pretend library card. Role playing can help set kids up for a positive lifetime habit.

Check out more on raising a kid who loves to read. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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Raising

Mother and daughter reading book lying in bed

Touch and Go. Get your baby comfortable with kids books by having him turn pages, make sound effects and point out and later identify objects that he recognizes.

Make it a Family Affair. Give story time a boost by getting your other children involved. Whenever possible, have the older siblings read to younger ones. Even if your older child can not sound out words by herself just yet, she will still enjoy telling familiar tales to her baby sister or brother. You can also enlist far flung grandparents to read a storybook to your little one by way of Skype or FaceTime.

Get Toddlers Hooked on Books. Incorporate reading into your daily routine. Let your child bring waterproof books into the tub. Have her help you carry in the mail, then look at catalogs together. If you are cooking with kids, read recipes out loud. Encourage your active toddler to act out scenes from the story you are reading. You can even record the antics for future viewing and some laughs.

Play Reading Games. Show your preschooler that words are everywhere. Point out street signs, the names on cereal boxes, labels on toy bins. When you read with him, let him take the lead, especially if it is a story he knows well. Or you can take turns reading to one another. If your child is ready, help him to write his own tale. Have him draw pictures in a bland book and dictate the story for you to write down.

Check out more on raising a kid who loves to read. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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Infants

Bond with your infant.

Cuddling with your child while reading to her is one of the joys of being a parent and it is a habit you should get into right from the start. While the sound of your voice is soothing to your infant, story time also helps her learn to talk and connect pictures with words. Babies love looking at other babies, so check out board books with pictures of infants or make your own by organizing baby photos of each family member of your family in a kid friendly binder. As you look through it, talk about the person in each image. Before you know it your child will be reading the album with you.

Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your friends. Remember to always praise your child.

Infants