Archive for the ‘Bonding’ Category

Children have a tendency to assign traits based on race accelerates in grade school. So if all the teachers at your child’s school are white while only people of color work in the lunchroom and handle security, the inequity will not be lost on your child. By age 7, most African-American kids believe whites are more likely to hold high status jobs. If you do not change your kids outlook when they are young, they will come to their own incorrect conclusions.

A couple from North Carolina, who has 2 biological white children and 2 adopted black children said it only took her then 4-year-old, who is from the Congo, only 3 months to learn enough English to ask, “Why are you yellow and I am purple?” “I told her that she is special and beautiful because of her skin.” A few months later she had told her mom that a classmate had taunted her by saying, “You are brown like poo-poo.” But her response to the kid made it clear that the message was getting through. “No, God made me pretty. Me brown like chocolate.” Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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Bonding

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Check a few things off of your to do list and have some fun at the same time.

Week 4: Rock the fall style–shop Crazy 8 for the new and now looks that your kids will love. Help them express their unique style, have one less thing to do before school actually starts, and always get a good deal!

Week 3: Channel some of that summer energy into a project that will benefit your community. Community service is an integral part of most school curriculums, and it will help you and your child connect with others. Contribute to your school directly and look for Tyson Project A+ labels on participating Tyson packages. For every label that you submit, Tyson will give your school 24 cents for whatever it needs.

Week 2: Host a back to school playdate for your children and their friends to help them to get back in the swing of things. Provide healthy snacks like deliciously baked, gluten-free Pirate’s Booty, Welch’s Fruit Snacks made with real fruit, and Mott’s 100% Juice. Mix in some fun with activities like “Telephone Story”. Have each person take a piece of paper, write a sentence, and pass it to the next person on their right to write the next line until you have a one of a kind story to share!

Week 1: Play with your food. Try using Mini Babybel Original semisoft cheese to create fruit and cheese skerers and Hillshire Farm Naturals Lunchmeat to create ham and cheese roll-ups. They are sure to be exciting and healthy additions to your kid’s lunchbox!

Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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Back To School

Preventing fights from flaring up in the first place is the best way to promote harmony in your family. Start by referring to your children as a team as often as possible. (“You guys are such a good clean up crew.”) or (“You two are quite the silly dancing duo.”) This gets you in the habit of praising their positive interactions. I myself will sometimes go the other way at poking fun at them. (“Your singing together sounds like chickens squawking during a fire alarm.”) Not only does this make them laugh, but it also moves them to defend their Ariana Grande like abilities to me, as a team.

Siblings who feel like they are working together, rather than being against each other, will naturally help each other out. Set up some situations in which your kids join forces, such as building a fort or making cupcakes. In order to earn playtime have them do chores together, such as clearing the table. The younger kids can clear the dishes and the older ones can stack and wash them. Then work as a team to dry them and put them away. If you have a dishwasher, give it the night off to do this. Working together, it will take no time at all. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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Here you will find a few ways that I use for helping my brood focus on the true meaning of the holidays.

  • Think of others. First, I have them gather all of their toys that they do not use anymore and put them in a box for children that could use them. They are completely shocked when we discuss how some children do not have any toys. We also participate in a giving tree in our community. Each of my kids picks a child in need and then we shop together for gifts. It teaches them not only do many other people need help, but there are a lot of ways that we can assist them.
  • Give to each other. The first time they got to buy gifts for the rest of the family, they were so excited. They get just as pumped seeing others open what they picked out as they do about opening the gifts themselves.
  • Let go of guilt. At times, I struggle with the fact that I can not give my kids everything. There is no vacation home or millions of presents under the tree, but we do have a lot of time to spend with each other. That is the most important gift of all. The other day at school, my oldest son was asked by his teacher what is his most valuable possession, and he said his Dad… so I guess I am doing something right.

Quick Tip: It is natural for kids to want to have everything. I explain to mine that some toys are just too expensive. Last year, for example, they wanted a Wii U game system. I said they could choose to combine their gifts and get that, but in the end, they decided not to. I also remind them that we are lucky to have a house, food, and a family.

Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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How Can You Handle The Holiday “Gimmees?”

 

Talk to your child about what they can do if they have a friend who is the one freaking out because they made a bad throw in the baseball game or have forgotten the words to a project they were suppose to recite in front of the class. At times, kids huddle around the kid who is upset and that makes it even worse. Instead, let them know that it is fine and just act normally. Though they could also think of a small gesture that might make their friend happy. They might say something like, “I will save you a seat at lunch.” or “See you on the bus later today.” If a child knows that their friend does not see a mistake as a big deal, they are more likely to give themselves a break too. Have you seen this one on taking the fear out of failure? Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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friendship

Your child may be fearful that you will not love them as much or be as proud of them if they mess up. Resist telling them the game or school play does not matter, which will invalidate their passions. Instead, you want to emphasize the message that you do not expect perfection, and while it does feel lousy to make a mistake, it is part of life and it will not affect how you feel about them. If they say that they do not want to be in that activity anymore because of a goof up, remind them of how much fun they had doing it and that they should hold on to those memories, rather than to dwell on one bad moment. Check out another post about learning from making mistakes. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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mistakes

Once your child’s initial hurt has subsided a bit, talk about how he got through it so he can cope with it a little better next time. You can ask, “Remember when you felt like this before? What did you do then?” You can also brainstorm together about different ways to avoid repeating the same mistake. This is what I did with my daughter, Jenna. She was in a school play and had forgotten a line. There was an uncomfortable silence and when Jenna had got backstage at the end of the show, she was so upset. Later, we came up with an idea that the audience probably would not even notice a missing line, so it is best to just keep going. She had put this strategy to the test a couple of months later. Jenna was performing in a different show and had some problems with her microphone, but instead of getting flustered, she covered it up beautifully. Making mistakes is part of growing up and how we handle them will help us grow. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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