Archive for the ‘Caregivers’ Category

Hello everyone. I have done this a few times in the past. The last time was a while ago though. Share something you have done recently with us. I am going to try to make this a monthly thing from now on. Keep it clean and enjoy.

ChildrensBooks2U

sharing

Talk to your child about what they can do if they have a friend who is the one freaking out because they made a bad throw in the baseball game or have forgotten the words to a project they were suppose to recite in front of the class. At times, kids huddle around the kid who is upset and that makes it even worse. Instead, let them know that it is fine and just act normally. Though they could also think of a small gesture that might make their friend happy. They might say something like, “I will save you a seat at lunch.” or “See you on the bus later today.” If a child knows that their friend does not see a mistake as a big deal, they are more likely to give themselves a break too. Have you seen this one on taking the fear out of failure? Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

ChildrensBooks2U

friendship

Your child may be fearful that you will not love them as much or be as proud of them if they mess up. Resist telling them the game or school play does not matter, which will invalidate their passions. Instead, you want to emphasize the message that you do not expect perfection, and while it does feel lousy to make a mistake, it is part of life and it will not affect how you feel about them. If they say that they do not want to be in that activity anymore because of a goof up, remind them of how much fun they had doing it and that they should hold on to those memories, rather than to dwell on one bad moment. Check out another post about learning from making mistakes. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

ChildrensBooks2U

mistakes

Once your child’s initial hurt has subsided a bit, talk about how he got through it so he can cope with it a little better next time. You can ask, “Remember when you felt like this before? What did you do then?” You can also brainstorm together about different ways to avoid repeating the same mistake. This is what I did with my daughter, Jenna. She was in a school play and had forgotten a line. There was an uncomfortable silence and when Jenna had got backstage at the end of the show, she was so upset. Later, we came up with an idea that the audience probably would not even notice a missing line, so it is best to just keep going. She had put this strategy to the test a couple of months later. Jenna was performing in a different show and had some problems with her microphone, but instead of getting flustered, she covered it up beautifully. Making mistakes is part of growing up and how we handle them will help us grow. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

ChildrensBooks2U

making-mistakes

A few ideas that may help you find your child more quickly.

ID Bracelet: Customize these bright disposable bracelets with your cell number and allergy/medical information.

Buddytag: These bracelets have a GPS tracker. A phone app tells you their whereabouts and alerts you if they go more than a specified distance away.

Temporary Tattoo: Write your cell number on one of these waterproof tattoos and paste it to your child’s arm.

Child ID Kit: Assemble one yourself with your child’s photo, height, weight, fingerprints and other identifying information to help law enforcement if ever necessary.

See critical information for other things to help you in an emergency. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your friends. Remember to always praise your child.

ChildrensBooks2U

IDBuddyTat

One way to foster independence and personal power, while maintaining limits, is to offer your toddler specific choices whenever possible. Begin as soon as your child can indicate their selection to you, either by pointing, signing or speaking. Most children are ready to participate meaningfully in choice making by 10 or 11 months old.

There are certain times when providing choices can be especially helpful to you. It can ease the transition from one activity to the next, for instance. (“Do you want to carry your hat or your snack to the car?”). Choices can also help provide structure in an overwhelming environment like a large playground.

Finally, think back to your past power struggles over nap time, diaper changing or getting in the car seat. With a little forethought, you might avoid conflict next time by offering your child a choice.

Take a look at a child’s input.

Child's Input

The blue one, please.