Archive for the ‘Kindergartener’ Category

Even good kids might be tempted to steal something that they really want.

When I took my 7-year-old nephew to the store and later learned that he had picked up a cookie and hid it in his pocket, I worried how he had learned this behavior and if it had become a habit. Much to my relief, I learned that petty thievery is normal for kids his age. By kindergarten, most children know it is not appropriate to take things that do not belong to them. However, they still have poor impulse control. Their desire to have something that they really want may be stronger than the little voice in their head telling them that stealing is not the right thing to do. And now that they are surrounded by a classroom full of their peers and seeing what everyone owns, the temptation to make a five-finger discount is even greater. In our upcoming posts, we will give you some strategies to help prevent and deal with stealing. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

ChildrensBooks2U

Sticky Fingers

Do you get sick of saying, “Be nice to your brother?” Show it instead. Make a heart out of construction paper. Every time your daughter treats her sibling badly, hand her the paper heart, then walk away. No lecture, no yelling, just a visual that will tell the story. Another, all-purpose option: a discreet thumbs up or thumbs down, or even a zip it motion across your lips. Most importantly, be consistent with these actions. See our previous post on drama. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

ChildrensBooks2U

heart

Of course, you want to explain the great “whys” in life to your kid, just not when you are trying to get out of the door in the morning. So save the elaborations for a time when your child needs more guidance. When you want something to happen, like getting to school before the morning bell rings, be direct and specific. Kids need concrete information, so instead of a vague “Get ready for school,” which leaves too much room for them to dawdle, give them direct instructions: “It is time to put on your coat and your backpack.” Getting specific works well in other situations too. Instead of “I want you on your best behavior in the restaurant,” you can say, “Please use your indoor voice at the table.”

See this post on getting kids to behave. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

ChildrensBooks2U

restaurant

On Facebook you shared the small things you can not help but agree to.

  • Pillow-fort night, with every pillow, blanket, stuffed animal, and comforter in the house.
  • Letting my 2-year-old choose her own outfit. It may clash and include a tiara, but hey, a girl has to accessorize!
  • Bubbles, even indoors.
  • My 8-year-olds strip of pink hair.
  • Mud puddles, always!
  • Baths, no matter what time of day. Sometimes you just need a bath to feel good.
  • Writing in shaving cream on the shower wall.
  • Indoor camping, complete with tent and s’mores!
  • Letting my 4-year-old polish my nails.
  • Breakfast in bed, just because!

Have you seen our series on NO? Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

ChildrensBooks2U

yes

So after careful consideration and realizing that I do have good, generally well-behaved children. I am not struggling with any major issues with my kids, just normal everyday stuff. Still, I must confess that sometimes I can not handle all of their requests, and saying “no” works. Simply saying no or barking orders about what kids should be doing can be expedient in the moment. However, it does not foster their sense of capability or independence and can make the situation ripe for power struggles. If I want to achieve the goal of being more positive, I would have to give more power and responsibility over to my kids. Positive discipline does not mean that kids always get their way or that you say yes to everything. It means giving kids opportunities to have some age appropriate control over their own world, within the firm and loving boundaries you feel comfortable with. Sounds like a good plan, right? In our upcoming posts, we will give you 3 strategies to use when you struggle with no the most. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

ChildrensBooks2U

  • Embrace playdates. Invite friends or relatives with kids to join you on outings and vacations. If he is around kids, there are sure to be some conflicts. That is a good thing since your child will learn to resolve them.
  • Be a little childish. If there is only one piece of pie left, split it instead of letting him have the whole thing to demonstrate sharing. Do not let him win every round of Candy Land or always decide what to watch on TV. Re-create some situations that he will encounter with peers.
  • Work it out in front of your kid. Seeing you and your spouse resolve your disagreements shows him that they are a fact of life and it is not the end of the world. Plus, he will learn some negotiation strategies just by watching you.

Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

ChildrensBooks2U

only-child

Indoor triggers can cause the symptoms we usually associate with spring. Here are some tips on how to combat the sniffles.

  • Identify the cause. If you or your child frequently show the classic signs of allergies, like sneezing, runny nose, and itchy eyes, check with a certified allergist. They can help you get to the root of the problem and will be able to suggest solutions.
  • Fight the dust mites. Some people are allergic to these microscopic critters who live in dust and are often found in bedding, mattresses, pillows, and carpets. Use mattress protectors made of finely woven material to prevent dust accumulation. Vacuum your carpets often.
  • Put Rover out. Keep your cat or dog out of your bedroom if you are allergic to animal hair. Symptoms can get worse at night. Consider buying a high efficiency furnace filter that will extract hair and dander particles from the air.
  • Get rid of mold. Basements, attics, bathrooms, or other areas of the home that are often damp can be a breeding ground for the fungus. Keep bathrooms clean and dry and avoid letting damp clothes or towels pile up.
  • Clean carefully. Dust, animal hair, and mold can be stirred up when you sweep or vacuum. Consider wearing a N95 high efficiency face mask to protect yourself against an allergic reaction.

Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

ChildrensBooks2U

allergy

ACHOO!