Archive for the ‘Reassuring Your Preschooler’ Category

You only asked her to turn off the computer. Now your kid is a giant mess. Here is what is really going on during this time of total meltdown.

Her face changes: Be on the lookout for her expression to change into a frown. This will signal an emotional change. Catch the signs and ask her what is wrong. You may be able to avoid a huge outburst.

Emotions can overload the brain: Your child’s anger triggers the left side of the brain and despair activates the right side. With the entire brain all lit up, she can not process any information. You just need to stay silent. Talking will just prolong the outburst.

Now the fight or flight kicks in: Stress is flooding your child’s system. Raising the blood pressure and a racing pulse. Deep breaths cause relaxation. Catch your child’s eye and try some. She may copy after you.

Distress comes in different phases: During a fit, emotions follow a pattern. First is rage, next is sadness possibly in the form of tears.

As the fury fizzles: When your child begins whining or collapsing it is a sign that the storm is ending. Go give your child a quick hug when this happens. Later, you can think of ways to avoid these strong reactions. For instance, a 5 minute warning before the computer is to be shut off. It is simple, but powerful.

Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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Ignite a can not put it down spark with our surefire picks and tips. Raise a kid who loves to read.

You have probably heard it before, but we will say it again: Reading makes kids smart. Engaging with kids books helps them excel in school. It will strengthen their vocabulary and spelling, as well as help them in math, science and reasoning skills. It gives them a sense of empathy, motivation and curiosity. I am sure you get the point. Reading is critical.

So now how do you get your kid hooked on reading books? Read to them, at least once a day. After that, the key is to be interactive. That means asking them a lot of questions, pointing out details for them in books and encouraging them to retell the story they read in their own words.

It is never too late to start. For little readers, make the experience tactile: Urge babies to touch and turn the pages. You can also mime actions, such as, eating and use toys for props.

As your child grows into the toddler years, identify colors and shapes on each page and then point them out in the world around you. Now is the time to start asking questions as well. (Where did the dog go? Why was Dad sad?) Help them relate to character’s emotions by asking them if they ever felt the same way.

Use your cutie’s love of imagination play to your advantage by visiting the library and making it a game at home. Stamp books and scan a pretend library card. Role playing can help set kids up for a positive lifetime habit.

Check out more on raising a kid who loves to read. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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Mother and daughter reading book lying in bed

Reassuring your preschooler when she feels frightened. The world can be a scary place, especially when you are only a few feet tall. Whether it is because of the dark, heights or dogs, preschoolers can become frightened. Rear is nature’s way of encouraging kids this age to be cautious, particularly in new situations, since they are still learning the basics about the world around them.

Intangible things that are unpredictable, like thunder and lightning or the loud sounds in a movie, can be terrifying for threes and fours. With their heightened imaginations, it is difficult for them to distinguish between fantasy and reality, which is why some movies may be too much for your child. Then she is scared, you child’s heart may start to beat faster and her tummy may feel upset. Emotionally, she is anxious and wants to withdraw from the situation.

When your child is upset, your natural response is to offer her a reassuring hug and let her hide under your arm. She will also need verbal reassurances that you understand her feelings. You might also offer her a few options to calm her nerves. For example, walking around the block or reading a favorite story.

Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Remember to always encourage and praise your child. Share this post with all your friends.

Reassuring Your Preschooler

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