Archive for the ‘Dental For Kids’ Category

Be Supportive. Encourage your child to give up sucking their thumb by praising their efforts. Be nonjudgmental and respectful if they slip. Try using a rewards system with a sticker chart to monitor your child’s progress.

Prevent It. Identify the times (tired, hungry) and places (car, TV room) that your child sucks their thumb rather than concentrating on the physical action. Try to anticipate their comfort needs ahead of time and give them extra attention.

Distract Them. Provide an interesting activity that requires their attention and keeps their hands busy. Play a board game with them. Have them turn the pages in a book instead of sucking their thumb while you read to them. Involve them in manipulative activities like coloring or squeezing play dough.

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Taking Comfort

Taking Comfort

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Why threes and fours love to suck their thumbs

Everyone has ways to help them relax. For you, it might be a warm bath, meditation or reading. Young children, too, adopt personal habits or rituals that make them feel more comfortable when they are stressed or upset. Some children stroke a security blanket or twist strands of hair, but many choose to suck their thumbs.

The thumb is really a perfect security tool for threes and fours, as it goes everywhere they do and never gets lost. Whether a child is dealing with mom leaving them with a caregiver or sitting through a long car ride, a good thumb suck can cure boredom or help them relax.

Once preschool begins, however, many parents become concerned if their child is still sucking their thumb. It may bother you that your daughter is not giving up “babyish” habits and you may fear that she is putting germs in her mouth. You may also wonder if the habit will affect incoming teeth or her speech development. This is not a big concern in children under the age of 4 and most children outgrow thumb sucking by the age of 5.

However, a child should cease thumb sucking by the time their permanent teeth come in, around 4 or 5 years of age. If the intensity of the sucking is aggressive, this could affect the development of the child’s teeth and roof of the mouth. Passive sucking is less likely to cause problems, but this situation should be discussed with your family dentist.

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Taking Comfort

Taking Comfort

Pediatric dentist know that all children are not alike. Every service is tailored to your child as an individual. Nitrous oxide/oxygen may not be effective for some children, especially those who have severe anxiety, nasal congestion or discomfort wearing a nasal mask. Your pediatric dentist will check your child’s medical history, level of anxiety and dental treatment needs and tell you if nitrous oxide/oxygen is recommended for your child. Pediatric dentists have comprehensive specialty training and can offer other sedation methods that are right for your child. Looking for more posts about nitrous oxide?

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Nitrous Oxide

Pediatric Dentist

First, give your child little or no food in the two hours preceding the dental visit (occasionally, nausea or vomiting occurs when a child has a full stomach). Second, tell your pediatric dentist about any respiratory condition that makes breathing through the nose difficult for your child, as it may limit the effectiveness of nitrous oxide/oxygen. Third, tell your pediatric dentist if your child is taking any medication on the day of the appointment. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Want to see more about nitrous oxide?

Nitrous Oxide

Pediatric Dentist

Very Safe. Nitrous oxide/oxygen is perhaps the safest sedative in dentistry. It is well tolerated. It has a rapid onset, is reversible, can be adjusted in various concentrations and is non-allergenic. Your child remains fully conscious–keeps all natural reflexes when breathing nitrous oxide/oxygen. He or she will be capable of responding to a question or request. Nitrous oxide/oxygen may also be used in combination with other sedative agents. Find out what nitrous oxide is if you miss that post. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed.

Nitrous Oxide

Pediatric Dentist

Your child will smell a faint, sweet aroma and experience a sense of well-being and relaxation. Since it may produce a feeling of giddiness or euphoria, it is often called “laughing gas.” Children sometimes report dreaming and their arms and legs may feel “tingly.” It raises the pain threshold and may even make the time seem to pass quickly. If your child is worried by the sights, sounds or sensations of dental treatment, he or she may respond more positively with the use of nitrous oxide/oxygen. To learn more, ask you dentist about nitrous oxide. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed.

Nitrous Oxide

Pediatric Dentist

Nitrous oxide/oxygen is a blend of two gases, oxygen and nitrous oxide. A fitted mask is placed over the nose and as the patient breathes normally, uptake occurs through the lungs. At the end of treatment, it is eliminated after a short period of breathing oxygen and has no lingering effects.

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Nitrous Oxide

Pediatric Dentist