Archive for the ‘Exercise’ Category

In Poor Weather, Outdoor Exercise Often Goes Out The Window. What is the solution? Bring it inside! You do not have to be outdoors to tone your muscles and to get your heart pumping. Look at winter as a chance to shake up your fitness routine. The same exercise routine, day in and day out, can start to get boring to you and stop challenging you. Create a set of activities that will work regardless of what the weather is. Consider riding an exercise bike or swimming indoors, doing aerobic dance or calisthenics, climbing stairs or skipping rope. Do you love to walk? Log in some miles at the local mall.

Need some more inside exercise tips? Try out a few of these:

  1. Turn your chores into a workin. Burn some calories by mopping, scrubbing or vacuuming.
  2. Dance to your favorite upbeat music.
  3. Join an exercise class. Try some yoga, kickboxing or body building/sculpting. Variety can keep you motivated and interested. A class also offers consistency and a social outlet.
  4. Work out to fitness videos or DVD’s. For variety, check out a few from your local library.
  5. Purchase a gym membership. Look for seasonal deals at a fitness club.
  6. Purchase some home exercise gear, such as a treadmill, stationary exercise bike or an elliptical trainer.
  7. Exercise as you watch your favorite TV shows. Get off the couch and lift weights. Do some leg lifts or stretching.

Now that you have plenty of ideas, there will no excuse for getting out of shape during the winter months. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

ChildrensBooks2U

workout

Making Your Workout A Workin

 

Here are some activities that can supplement a child’s speech or language therapy program.

Stuttering: A child experiences a break or disfluency in their speech, manifested as repetitions of words, syllables or prolonged sounds.

Activity: During conversation, resist completing your child’s phrases or words. Be patient and let them work through a sentence or thought. Then, rather than correct any “broken” words, repeat back to your child what was said. This shows them that you are listening carefully and provides a relaxed and correct model of the words.

Frontal lisps: The most common form of a lisp. In this type, a child pronounces an “s” sound more like a “th” than an “s”.

Activity: Games that give you an opportunity to model the “s” sound and your child to practice it back. Play Bingo using words that start with “s”. Or use the card game Go Fish with words with “s” sounds instead of numbers. Also, check out Superduper publications for books and games that work on articulation and phonological skills.

Auditory processing or receptive language deficit: A child has trouble processing a conversation or understanding what has just been said.

Activity: Promote situations where your child must listen and follow directions in order to get a reward. A good option is the game Twister, which requires your child to listen to directions and then translate them into an action.

Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your friends. Remember to always praise your children.

Communication Confidence

Stuttering, Frontal Lisps, Auditory Processing or Receptive Language

There are valuable life lessons to be learned in those weekend trips with the kids.

Amusement Parks: An awesome place to give the older children a quick course in time management. Look over the map with your child and ask them to estimate how much time it will take to get from one ride to the next one. Plan a very loose itinerary, give your child a watch and appoint him the Clock Master to keep the group on schedule.

Miniature Golf: This is a lesson in where everyone can practice patience (as you are waiting for the group in front of you to move to the next hole) and also a lesson in taking turns (as each person in your group steps up to putt). Pick a fair but simple rule about who will go first. I like drawing straws. Keep a few silly conversation starters or word games on hand to pass the time while you are waiting.

Farms: This is where your child can exercise compassion as they greet each animal and learn how farmers take care of the cows and bunnies and pigs. While you are there you can start a conversation about healthy eating and where different types of food in your kitchen comes from.

Indoor Play Spaces: This is the ideal environment for lessons on perseverance. When your young child yearns to follow their big sister up the rock wall, encourage them to go for it, carefully! If on the first try at rope swing ends with a crash landing, help your child find the courage to give the challenge another try.

Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Always praise your child.

Family Field Trips

Field trip at the farm

When spending special time with a son, dads can try activities based on the child’s interests, not just his own. This allows the son to be the expert who can explain a new skill to an eager audience. The sense of power, competence and confidence a child feels when helping a parent learn something is immense. It also lets the child see his father strive. In watching Dad learn, your son is learning how to face struggle or failure, how to practice something new and how to demonstrate the fortitude and perseverance necessary for success. See our post on Follow His Lead.

Offer Support. When your son knows you are truly interested in learning his passion, he will open up in new ways. Use the opportunity to talk about his friends, school struggles or other worries.

Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Always praise your children.

Follow His Lead

Father and Son

Most dads look forward to raising a son-they imagine a time when they can play baseball or build a go-kart together, for example. Indeed, fathers play a crucial role in kids’ lives. They tend to engage in more active play than mothers, which helps kids learn to regulate their emotions and resist the urge to act aggressively. Fathers typically encourage their child’s independence and achievement, balancing out the mother’s emphasis on nurturance and protection.

Fostering the father-son bond is important for 7- and 8-year-olds. It has been shown that boys who have strong attachments to their fathers make stronger connections with peers, express more confidence and emotional security and get better grades.

Join The Fun. Follow these steps: Notice your child’s interests; while sitting nearby, watch how he extends his own activity; participate in the activity without taking over; and follow the inclinations and interests of your son.

Want to see more post about younger children? Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your friends. Remember to always praise your child.

Follow His Lead

Father and Son

Double leg hop. Place five throw pillows or for younger kids, empty paper towel rolls in a row, with space between each. Have your child hop over the objects, keeping their legs shoulder width apart.

Frog leap. Have your child squat down (like a frog) with their bottom toward the ground and knees out. Then have him leap up into the air and land in the crouched position. Do this up to 10 times.

Single leg hop to the side. Stand with both legs shoulder width apart. Lift the left leg (so only the right leg is touching the floor) and hop to the right side. Reverse legs. Complete five reps on each side. You can even set up a hopscotch board for this so they can do side jumps and forward jumps.

See more bone building exercises for young children.

Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends.

Bone Building Bonanza

Child’s Workout