Archive for the ‘Grateful’ Category

Well, sure, you do not want to stand on ceremony in your own home: but it is a mistake to dispense with courtesy. Because that small and basic back-and-forth act of saying thank you for snipping some chives for the baked potatoes, for being so much fun to spend time with, for getting drinks for our guests has ramifications that are huge and complex. Gratitude is defined as a life orientation. It has been found that grateful kids are happier and more satisfied with their life. They do better in school and are less materialistic and less inclined to be depressed. One of our goals is to have a nice, peaceful, cohesive home that is filled with harmony. Feeling grateful and expressing it is crucial. Thank you for sharing. Thank you for playing with me. Thank you for coming to the basement with me when I was scared. So often, parents miss the boat on thanking their kids and I should also add, their spouse. If they do something nice and you thank them, it shows that you respect them, you acknowledge how they are benefiting your life. Being appreciated, that is one of the greatest feelings.

Besides, kids (not to mention adults) who are in the habit of expressing gratitude are simply more fun to spend time with. When a recent camping trip got rained out, there was some doom and gloom in the room. But the kids also saw the silver lining. At least we got to have a fire in our fire pit at home. Sure, there is room for occasional griping, but we were simply happier when we are inclined to look on the bright side of things. Check our this wonderful children’s book on love and harmony. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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Gratitude

Here you will find a few ways that I use for helping my brood focus on the true meaning of the holidays.

  • Think of others. First, I have them gather all of their toys that they do not use anymore and put them in a box for children that could use them. They are completely shocked when we discuss how some children do not have any toys. We also participate in a giving tree in our community. Each of my kids picks a child in need and then we shop together for gifts. It teaches them not only do many other people need help, but there are a lot of ways that we can assist them.
  • Give to each other. The first time they got to buy gifts for the rest of the family, they were so excited. They get just as pumped seeing others open what they picked out as they do about opening the gifts themselves.
  • Let go of guilt. At times, I struggle with the fact that I can not give my kids everything. There is no vacation home or millions of presents under the tree, but we do have a lot of time to spend with each other. That is the most important gift of all. The other day at school, my oldest son was asked by his teacher what is his most valuable possession, and he said his Dad… so I guess I am doing something right.

Quick Tip: It is natural for kids to want to have everything. I explain to mine that some toys are just too expensive. Last year, for example, they wanted a Wii U game system. I said they could choose to combine their gifts and get that, but in the end, they decided not to. I also remind them that we are lucky to have a house, food, and a family.

Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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How Can You Handle The Holiday “Gimmees?”

 

We all know that you are extremely busy, but they will appreciate you for making these small simple gestures.

  1. Wear the macaroni necklace to work. At least until you are safely out the door.
  2. Tape a family slogan to the refrigerator door and use it whenever your child feels discouraged. Like Unstoppable or We can, We will!
  3. Go for a walk with just one child.
  4. Slip a note or a piece of chocolate into their lunchbox.
  5. Build your own Minecraft world right next to theirs.
  6. Say “Yes” to something that is usually off limits. Like sitting on the counter or eating popcorn in the living room.
  7. Show as much excitement at the amusement park as they do.
  8. If you argue in front of your child, make sure they also see you makeup.
  9. When their room looks like a tornado swept through it, close the door and get on with your day.
  10. Use Skype or Facetime with the grandparents once in a while.
  11. If your child has given their best efforts and is still miserable and truly wants to quit the team, give them your blessing.
  12. Let your little one stomp in a puddle once in a while.
  13. Get out some glitter glue and make a birthday card for your child.
  14. Take in a pet that needs a good home and a child’s love.
  15. Let your toddler fight their own battles on the playground before you intervene.

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Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your friends. Remember to always praise your child.

SINGLE-PARENT-DAY

Tweens: At this age, kids tend to be more focused on “stuff,” so your focus should be on differentiating between basic needs (clothes, food) versus privileges that kids have to earn (designer coat, new video game). For example, if your child decides they want a new video game or a second pair of boots, jointly come up with a schedule of chores to earn money. You can also offer a weekly allowance that is contingent on household responsibilities. This basic process not only helps children be grateful for what they have, but also helps them develop an overall appreciation for all the work that enables them to live comfortably.

Teens: Keep the attitude of gratitude going by encouraging teens to come up with their own ways of expressing thanks. For example, they might post a photo of something they are grateful for daily on Instagram or write one note of gratitude a day in a journal. At this age, becoming involved in a cause or volunteer project is an ideal way for kids to turn their appreciation into action and experience how showing your gratitude can really make a big difference. See this kids story book on showing gratefulness.

See more tips on gratitude. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Keep on praising your child.

Gratitude

Thank You