Posts Tagged ‘Appreciate’

Some back to school traditions create lasting memories by way of the senses. By having freshly baked cookies after the first day of school will evoke those sensory memories in your kids when they are older. Have some warm cookies waiting for them when they get home the first day. It gets them to stay and share a bit of their day with you.

Whether you mark the new school year with a simple photo or a fun family outing, the important thing is to take the time to create special memories for your kids. While even parents of young children know that time passes quickly, parents whose children are grown really realize how life speeds to fast forward once kids begin school. A back to school tradition can help your family hold on to that sense of togetherness and belonging, making even the everyday seem that much more special to them. See more on family traditions.

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Bake Some Memories

Baking with Mom

Simple, memorable ways to mark the new school year.

Getting Back Into The School Groove can be stressful. Establishing fun back-to-school traditions can help you kids feel more secure as they advance to the next grade. Traditions also strengthen family bonds and create fun memories.

Having back-to-school rituals that carry over from year to year can be especially helpful for children who are nervous about starting the new school year. “Most kids feel better when they know what is coming, when they know what the expectations are”.

Traditions do not have to be complicated, time consuming or expensive to be special. They just have to be right for your family. In the upcoming posts will be some ideas for making memorable traditions when your kids return to school.

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Back-To-School

Fun

Leaving your child in another ones care is a learning opportunity.

Enjoy Your Freedom. It is a good thing for your child to see that you have a life and a source of joy other than them. Your going away also gives your child the opportunity to get to know their caregiver in a new way.

Let Them Reach Out. Rather than call, which might remind your child how much they miss you, you should invite your child to call you when they want to touch base with you. You might also choose to text or email to keep the communication on the light side.

Leave A Love Note. Give your caregiver a note to give your child at breakfast or record your voice reading a bedtime story. This allows your child to know you are thinking about them without taking them away from the fun activities they will be doing in your absence.

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Hanging With Your Aunt

I Love My Aunt!

Tweens: At this age, kids tend to be more focused on “stuff,” so your focus should be on differentiating between basic needs (clothes, food) versus privileges that kids have to earn (designer coat, new video game). For example, if your child decides they want a new video game or a second pair of boots, jointly come up with a schedule of chores to earn money. You can also offer a weekly allowance that is contingent on household responsibilities. This basic process not only helps children be grateful for what they have, but also helps them develop an overall appreciation for all the work that enables them to live comfortably.

Teens: Keep the attitude of gratitude going by encouraging teens to come up with their own ways of expressing thanks. For example, they might post a photo of something they are grateful for daily on Instagram or write one note of gratitude a day in a journal. At this age, becoming involved in a cause or volunteer project is an ideal way for kids to turn their appreciation into action and experience how showing your gratitude can really make a big difference. See this kids story book on showing gratefulness.

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Gratitude

Thank You

During the holiday’s, it is easy to be grateful for family, friends and everything we have, but how do you help kids give thanks year round? Use this age by age guide as your starting point.

7 To 8-Year-Olds: While teaching gratitude to younger kids is certainly important, this is the stage at which your child is really able to understand the concept on a deeper level. Make being appreciative a part of a child’s every day by making it fun. Start a weekly tradition in which you go around the dinner table and each person talks about one thing they appreciated that day. You can also create a Wall of Thanks in the kitchen or family room where everyone can write what they are thankful for on sticky notes, then post them. Check out this story book for kids on showing gratitude. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your friends. Remember to always praise your child.

Gratitude

Thank You