Posts Tagged ‘child’

When your kid hears you use words like don’t and stop, it will trigger an almost Pavlovian response so they tune out. Put requests in an encouraging tone. Instead of “don’t pull the dog’s tail,” try “pet Ginger gently.” And when you really need your kid’s attention. Whisper. Nothing is more riveting than a secret, even “time for bed” goes down better in a hushed voice. See our post on Choices. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

ChildrensBooks2U

Spin

Kids, not unlike grown-ups like to feel in control. So capitalize on this desire. Instead of asking a question like, “Can you pick up your toys please?” When in reality there is only one acceptable answer, propose some options even if they are not exactly monumental. Give your child a choice, such as “Please pick up two of your toys or that box next to your bed,” which defuses the “no” bomb before it has a chance to ignite. See our post on cause and effect. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

ChildrensBooks2U

choice

When your child refuses to wear a hat or mittens outside on a cold and windy day, then complains that they are cold, you can simply point out how those items would of helped (then produce the ones that you secretly stashed in your bag). If they refuse cold weather protection again, you can gently remind them of what happened last time. Check out our show and don’t tell post. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

ChildrensBooks2U

cause

 

 

Do you get sick of saying, “Be nice to your brother?” Show it instead. Make a heart out of construction paper. Every time your daughter treats her sibling badly, hand her the paper heart, then walk away. No lecture, no yelling, just a visual that will tell the story. Another, all-purpose option: a discreet thumbs up or thumbs down, or even a zip it motion across your lips. Most importantly, be consistent with these actions. See our previous post on drama. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

ChildrensBooks2U

heart

Kids have a ton of a lot more stamina than you do. So your child will question, debate, argue, and oppose as long as you let them. (Bedtime battles, anyone?) Every time that you engage in this kind of back and forth exchange, you give them the opportunity to get stronger and better at it. Instead of giving repeated warnings and reminders, give one (“You have ten more minutes to play, then it is time to go to bed”) and ignore any arguments after that. If all else fails, pull out this classic on: Because I am the boss and I said so. You can also check out our post on bad habits. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

ChildrensBooks2U

drama

The best way to eliminate an unwanted behavior is to substitute an alternative one in its place. Or in other words the positive opposite of unwanted behavior. Instead of focusing on what you do not want your child to do (“I hate when he talks back!”) consider what it is that you do want him to do. (“When it is time to clean up, I want him to simply do it.”)

One sure way to lead him to a positive habit is with praise. When he is behaving well, first act sincerely excited (“Wow!”). Next, specify exactly what you are loving (“You were mad, but you used your words instead of hitting”). Finally, add something physical (a hug or a high five). Give your child props even for small successes, like letting a younger sibling have a turn with a favorite toy. Every time you reinforce a partial success, you are moving that much closer to you ultimate goal. SeeĀ turn it into a challenge for more ways to improve development.

ChildrensBooks2U

high-5

Seeing that kids love to play, turning a good behavior into a game makes it more likely they will follow directions. Have a child who sighs about having to get on their shoes? Try, “I bet you can not get your tennis shoes on in 45 seconds!” Have a child reluctant to brush their teeth? “I wonder who can brush their teeth longer, you or me!” If you are at the grocery store, play “I Spy” to keep them occupied while you shop, or let them fill a produce bag with apples or choose a vegetable for dinner.

Cut right to the chase is another tactic that works very well. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

ChildrensBooks2U

shoe-tying