Posts Tagged ‘Cleaning’

One in five cases of food borne illnesses happen in the home. Do not let germs crash your Thanksgiving table!

  • Soap up. You have heard it a million times before, but washing your hands with soap is key, because it binds to germs, allowing them to be rinsed off with water. Choose liquid soap with a pump; bar soap left on a dish can harbor bacteria.
  • Wait to stuff. If you fill your turkey with stuffing, do so just before putting the bird in the oven. Leaving uncooked food out for an extended period of time while prepping can increase the chances of germs multiplying.
  • Take its temperature. Cook the turkey thoroughly, until the meat is no longer pink, to avoid the possibility of salmonella. (You can see recommended cooking times at usda.gov.) To be totally safe, use a meat thermometer and check the temperature in the breast of the bird, not the fat or bone, which could be higher. It should be at least 165 degrees when you take it out.
  • Double rinse. Even if you are using a pre-washed salad, wash produce again for 10-20 seconds, because germs and pesticides can linger on the leaves. The same goes for fruits and veggies. If you buy a head of lettuce or cabbage, remove the outer leaves and then wash.
  • Trace your steps. After handling raw meat, clean all surfaces, such as the kitchen faucet, sink, counter tops and cutting boards. Use warm water and soap, followed by a bleach solution. (One tablespoon of bleach to one quart of water.) Make a note of the routes that germs travel. For example, if you touch the raw turkey and then open the fridge, clean the fridge handle as well.

Following these steps will give you the best chance of having a germ free holiday and allow you to enjoy spending the time with your family and friends. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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Sure the door is closed on your closet and can conceal a lot of stuff, but paring down will make the morning rush a bit easier.

  • Remove everything from your closet and hang up only your ten favorite pieces. Pack the rest into bags, as if you were moving and take out additional items only as needed. At the end of the season, consider donating what ever remains.
  • Collect any items that have sentimental value but are not being worn and add them to the keepsake bin you set up. Even better yet, preserve the memories with a pic and donate the pieces to charity.
  • Purge your closet of any pairs of shoes that are uncomfortable and put the rest on a rack.
  • Repair all of the clothes that have missing buttons, minor tears, broken zippers or undone hems or you can finally take them to the seamstress.
  • If you just do one thing, establish a labeled donation box in each closet for any outgrown, ill fitting or out of style clothing and weed out items as you go.

Also, check out how to clean your pantry.

Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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closet-organization

Are you tired of hunting for ingredients? Eliminate excess, streamline storage space and create lasting order with these simple tips.

  • Use up any half emptied boxes of rice, pasta or any other dried goods that are taking up shelf space with specially designed recipes.
  • Toss spices and herbs that have been just sitting around unused for longer than you can remember. Extracts and whole spices generally stay fresh for 4 years. Ground spices for up to 3-4 years. Dried leafy herbs for 1-3 years and seasoning blends for about 2 years.
  • Group like items together (pasta and rice on one shelf, canned items on another), and use shelf dividers to maintain order.
  • Avoid storing things more than a layer deep. What you can not see, you likely will not use.
  • Save the cooking directions from a food item’s original packaging and tape them to the inside lid of your airtight containers.
  • If you do just one thing, at the end of each quarter, donate any unused food items that are more than a year old to make room for ones you will actually use.

24 is the average number of canned food items in a pantry, but we use an average of only 5 per week.

Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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pantry