Posts Tagged ‘Cool’

Check a few things off of your to do list and have some fun at the same time.

Week 4: Rock the fall style–shop Crazy 8 for the new and now looks that your kids will love. Help them express their unique style, have one less thing to do before school actually starts, and always get a good deal!

Week 3: Channel some of that summer energy into a project that will benefit your community. Community service is an integral part of most school curriculums, and it will help you and your child connect with others. Contribute to your school directly and look for Tyson Project A+ labels on participating Tyson packages. For every label that you submit, Tyson will give your school 24 cents for whatever it needs.

Week 2: Host a back to school playdate for your children and their friends to help them to get back in the swing of things. Provide healthy snacks like deliciously baked, gluten-free Pirate’s Booty, Welch’s Fruit Snacks made with real fruit, and Mott’s 100% Juice. Mix in some fun with activities like “Telephone Story”. Have each person take a piece of paper, write a sentence, and pass it to the next person on their right to write the next line until you have a one of a kind story to share!

Week 1: Play with your food. Try using Mini Babybel Original semisoft cheese to create fruit and cheese skerers and Hillshire Farm Naturals Lunchmeat to create ham and cheese roll-ups. They are sure to be exciting and healthy additions to your kid’s lunchbox!

Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

ChildrensBooks2U

Back To School

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When your child refuses to wear a hat or mittens outside on a cold and windy day, then complains that they are cold, you can simply point out how those items would of helped (then produce the ones that you secretly stashed in your bag). If they refuse cold weather protection again, you can gently remind them of what happened last time. Check out our show and don’t tell post. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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cause

 

 

On Facebook you shared the small things you can not help but agree to.

  • Pillow-fort night, with every pillow, blanket, stuffed animal, and comforter in the house.
  • Letting my 2-year-old choose her own outfit. It may clash and include a tiara, but hey, a girl has to accessorize!
  • Bubbles, even indoors.
  • My 8-year-olds strip of pink hair.
  • Mud puddles, always!
  • Baths, no matter what time of day. Sometimes you just need a bath to feel good.
  • Writing in shaving cream on the shower wall.
  • Indoor camping, complete with tent and s’mores!
  • Letting my 4-year-old polish my nails.
  • Breakfast in bed, just because!

Have you seen our series on NO? Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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yes

Let us talk about it. Third grade is a time where it starts to get exciting at our school. The kids are allowed to walk home alone. When Jenna first asked me if she could, my gut told me to say “no.” I was a bit overwhelmed by all the risks: The school is more than a mile away, there are busy intersections, what if she gets lost or hurt, what if a stranger approaches her? It felt much easier to keep her safe and close.

But instead of giving in to my primal instinct, I followed some sound advice, “Hmmm let us talk about that.” I came up with three key questions. One: “Why is that important to you? (Jenna explained that everyone who walks home from school says it is fun, and she wants to have a little freedom). Two: “If I say ‘yes’ to your request, what are some important things that you need to remember to do?” (We sat down together with a map going over the route she would take and pointing out crossing guards and sidewalks). Three: “What can I do to help you be more successful?” (Jenna’s answer was simple: “Trust me.”) Once you know your child has covered all the bases, express confidence in her and let it happen.

On the first day, I allowed Jenna to walk home alone, I admit that I hid behind a tree in my yard until I saw her round the corner. Relieved, I ran inside so she wouldn’t catch me spying and gave her a hug when she proudly walked through the door. Though I mourned the loss of a piece of her childhood. I knew that I had made the right decision.

Sometimes we do not have the luxury to consider every request and have to say ‘no’. But it is crucial to let your kids know that you are taking their needs and desires into account and really considering them. Then they too, are more likely to feel they are being heard. Did you miss part 2? Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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walking

If you do need to get involved, your job is not to decide who is right and who is wrong. You are just simply a mediator. Start the conversation by stating what you have seen or heard. “You seem to be having trouble deciding who gets to wear the fancy dress up shoes.” Have each child tell their side of the story without shouting or hurling insults. Just to make sure they are listening to each other, have them repeat what the other has said. Then you can ask the million dollar question, “What can we do to solve this?” Let each child share their ideas. Try one of the proposed solutions, no matter how crazy it sounds. “OK, we can give the shoes a time-out in the freezer.” If they do need further direction, offer them some suggestions. “Each of you could wear the shoes for 10 minutes, we will set the timer to keep track.” Keep reminding yourself that your kids are practicing the art of conflict resolution. They are expressing themselves calmly, listening, validating other perspectives, and coming to an agreement. This approach requires time, energy, and great patience, but the payoff is well worth it. Doing it every time they fight is difficult. But if you adopt this strategy a few times, they will pick up on it.  And eventually, they will learn to resolve disagreements without you, which is the whole point of being a parent. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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cool

 

 

Charging into a battle zone and yelling, “Stop it right now!” might shock your kids into silence, but it will not prevent them from resuming their confrontation as soon as you leave the room. I know, I have done it myself on more than one occasion. Sure, it is hard to listen to your kids fight and difficult to manage your anger. Both at them and at yourself for not being able to keep the peace. Now consider counting to ten before you storm the room. I stop and look at the pictures hanging in the hallway. My serenity restoring trick is a sign I wrote on a piece of notebook paper and taped it to the refrigerator. It says, “Five deep breaths.” Every time I look at it, I follow these directions. It really is a big help. See tips on staying out of it. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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cool