Posts Tagged ‘Parenting’

Kids have a ton of a lot more stamina than you do. So your child will question, debate, argue, and oppose as long as you let them. (Bedtime battles, anyone?) Every time that you engage in this kind of back and forth exchange, you give them the opportunity to get stronger and better at it. Instead of giving repeated warnings and reminders, give one (“You have ten more minutes to play, then it is time to go to bed”) and ignore any arguments after that. If all else fails, pull out this classic on: Because I am the boss and I said so. You can also check out our post on bad habits. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

ChildrensBooks2U

drama

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So after careful consideration and realizing that I do have good, generally well-behaved children. I am not struggling with any major issues with my kids, just normal everyday stuff. Still, I must confess that sometimes I can not handle all of their requests, and saying “no” works. Simply saying no or barking orders about what kids should be doing can be expedient in the moment. However, it does not foster their sense of capability or independence and can make the situation ripe for power struggles. If I want to achieve the goal of being more positive, I would have to give more power and responsibility over to my kids. Positive discipline does not mean that kids always get their way or that you say yes to everything. It means giving kids opportunities to have some age appropriate control over their own world, within the firm and loving boundaries you feel comfortable with. Sounds like a good plan, right? In our upcoming posts, we will give you 3 strategies to use when you struggle with no the most. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

ChildrensBooks2U

You are as tired of the word as your kids are of hearing it. Follow a parenting expert’s strategies for getting kids to behave by saying yes more often. Then sit back and enjoy the positive results.

At the end, of a busy weekend of baseball practice, birthday parties, and grocery shopping, we have family friends over for dinner. The kids are, simply put, crazy. Running around, pulling toys out of every basket, and jumping from couch to chair and then back again. My three sons come to me every 3 minutes with a different request. “No,” I say, barely listening to them. But then my 10-year-old makes a statement that does catch my attention. “My dad says no all the time,” he tells his buddy. Hearing my son describe me as a 24/7 “no” dad was surprised and a bit hurtful. I have to admit I do resort to the reflexive no, particularly during stressful times of the day, like the morning rush to get my oldest out the door for school and in the evening crunch around bedtime. Still, I do not want my kids to think I am not listening or considering their needs and requests. I want them to know they have a voice, a say in our family. So in an attempt to address my “no-ness,” I decided to reach out for a bit of assistance. Let’s face it, we all need it from time to time. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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  • Embrace playdates. Invite friends or relatives with kids to join you on outings and vacations. If he is around kids, there are sure to be some conflicts. That is a good thing since your child will learn to resolve them.
  • Be a little childish. If there is only one piece of pie left, split it instead of letting him have the whole thing to demonstrate sharing. Do not let him win every round of Candy Land or always decide what to watch on TV. Re-create some situations that he will encounter with peers.
  • Work it out in front of your kid. Seeing you and your spouse resolve your disagreements shows him that they are a fact of life and it is not the end of the world. Plus, he will learn some negotiation strategies just by watching you.

Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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only-child

Charging into a battle zone and yelling, “Stop it right now!” might shock your kids into silence, but it will not prevent them from resuming their confrontation as soon as you leave the room. I know, I have done it myself on more than one occasion. Sure, it is hard to listen to your kids fight and difficult to manage your anger. Both at them and at yourself for not being able to keep the peace. Now consider counting to ten before you storm the room. I stop and look at the pictures hanging in the hallway. My serenity restoring trick is a sign I wrote on a piece of notebook paper and taped it to the refrigerator. It says, “Five deep breaths.” Every time I look at it, I follow these directions. It really is a big help. See tips on staying out of it. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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cool

There are some administrators that are concerned about the extremely competitive parenting culture these days. Trying to get your child into an accelerated learning group has become its own kind of race. This could cause negative consequences for students. Not every child can be in the top 10 percent all the time. Rather than lobbying to have your kid placed into the top level, concerned parents will be better off finding a group that is just right for them. The decision to use flexible learning groups for reading and math usually happens at the district level. However, the teaching methods can vary from school to school and sometimes even class to class. It is all depending on the teacher’s willingness to implement these groups. They can have a significant impact on a child’s education in grade school and beyond. To make sure that your kid’s educational needs are being met, we will give you a checklist to follow in our next posts. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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Gifted

Whether it is the first or the tenth time, leaving your child overnight often evokes excitement for you, we all need the occasional break, after all, but also guilt and worry (“Will she be OK without me?”). Your 7 or 8 year-old may have the same kinds of feelings.

Children this age are becoming more independent in all aspects of their lives. They are better able to keep track of their belongings and follow through on expectations. Their circle of friends has widened and they require less supervision. Most children love this new found freedom.

But many feel ambivalent. The world is a big place and not all adventures work out the way they had hoped. As a result, 7 and 8-year-olds commonly engage in a “push and pull” with parental attention, needing it immensely at some points and shunning it at others.

This ambivalence can make it tricky to plan an adults only outing. But doing so allows your child a safe tryout into the world of being without you. It allows him to take on additional responsibility on a short term basis, to experiment with coping skills and to deepen bonds with another caregiver.

You can deal with the guilt you may feel by remembering that you are creating learning opportunities for your child. You may also want to choose a close relative as a caregiver, like an aunt, to ease your mind. Provide suggestions for activities to the caregiver, but leave the door open for her to come up with her own spur of the moment plans. Share details about bedtime or other routines in writing. Finally, try to project confidence in your child’s ability to manage without you and in your own ability to manage without her.

Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your friends. Remember to always praise your child. Tips for yours child’s time with their aunt.

Hanging With Your Aunt

I Love My Aunt!