Posts Tagged ‘Preschoolers’

Keep your child exposed to diversity regularly.

Many studies have found that the more contact people of all ages have with those from backgrounds that are different from their own, the less likely they are to be biased. Some parents have choosen preschools for their children where half of the children had physical disabilities. There is a belief that in doing this and exposing them to special needs kids would make them more accepting of all kinds of people. Some have carried this onto choosing kindergarten for their children. While others have mixed it up a bit choosing a Spanish immersion school or choosing schools where the white to black mix is 50 to 50. By doing this as they get older and move into middle school and high school they will feel comfortable around all kinds of different people and show respect to them equally. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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Diversity

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Lead Your Child By Example

For your child to become truly open minded toward all kinds of people, you need to be a positive role model. In a study done in Child Development, the lone factor shown to reduce children’s prejudice was whether their parents had a friend of another race. If you say, “We should be friends with all kinds of people”, but the only ones who come over for dinner are those who look like you, what is your child going to think?

There are a lot of parents that talk a good game about embracing diversity, yet subtly communicate something totally different. Do you laugh when you hear a joke about a racial group? Are you willing to point out intolerance when you see it? We know that kids learn from what they see more than from what they hear. Check out one of our recent posts on respect. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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Diverse Dinner

You should also be honest about the fact that discrimination still exists. If you talk about past inequalities and then tell your child that we have fixed that and we are all equal now, it can actually encourage prejudicial beliefs because children will see remaining inequalities as the result of how hard people work. Instead, talking honestly about systematic racial bias, like how wealth inequity is not a reflection of an individual’s efforts, but rather tied to the legacy of discrimination can help your child to understand that these are not individual issues.

Research bears this out. Elementary school children read biographies of famous African Americans. One group’s stories included details about how the person had encountered forms of racial discrimination and the other group did not. Afterward, the kids whose books included the true historical context found the subjects more likable and sympathetic.

Check out one of our more recent posts on a respectful child. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child. A quick reminder that all of our Halloween children’s books on the website are now on sale.

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Halloween Doodles

 

Treating people of all races and backgrounds honorably is not just politically correct, it is the right thing to do, the respectful thing.

When my 4-year-old son, David, started flipping out about going to preschool, I thought it was typical first day jitters. Then he told me the reason: I do not want a teacher with brown skin. Our family who is white and live in a diverse neighborhood in Northwest Indiana. I must admit I was a bit horrified and confused. He had been around people of many races before. Our neighbor who had babysat for David before when he was a toddler is African American. But his new teacher whom he had met before at the school orientation was from Africa, so I think it had more to do with her accent. Concerned I turned to a psychologist who was also a family friend. I was reassured that little David was not being a racist.

It is natural for young kids to notice differences in a person’s appearance and manner of speaking, and to express curiosity or even fear about them. Many of us can probably share a comparably mortifying moment, whether it was our kid’s insensitive comment about someone in a wheelchair or an objectionable question about why a classmate of Asian descent has “squinty” eyes. In our upcoming posts we will share some steps with you that you can take to teach your child how to be open minded. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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Reassuring your preschooler when she feels frightened. The world can be a scary place, especially when you are only a few feet tall. Whether it is because of the dark, heights or dogs, preschoolers can become frightened. Rear is nature’s way of encouraging kids this age to be cautious, particularly in new situations, since they are still learning the basics about the world around them.

Intangible things that are unpredictable, like thunder and lightning or the loud sounds in a movie, can be terrifying for threes and fours. With their heightened imaginations, it is difficult for them to distinguish between fantasy and reality, which is why some movies may be too much for your child. Then she is scared, you child’s heart may start to beat faster and her tummy may feel upset. Emotionally, she is anxious and wants to withdraw from the situation.

When your child is upset, your natural response is to offer her a reassuring hug and let her hide under your arm. She will also need verbal reassurances that you understand her feelings. You might also offer her a few options to calm her nerves. For example, walking around the block or reading a favorite story.

Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Remember to always encourage and praise your child. Share this post with all your friends.

Reassuring Your Preschooler

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