Posts Tagged ‘Teens’

Once your child’s initial hurt has subsided a bit, talk about how he got through it so he can cope with it a little better next time. You can ask, “Remember when you felt like this before? What did you do then?” You can also brainstorm together about different ways to avoid repeating the same mistake. This is what I did with my daughter, Jenna. She was in a school play and had forgotten a line. There was an uncomfortable silence and when Jenna had got backstage at the end of the show, she was so upset. Later, we came up with an idea that the audience probably would not even notice a missing line, so it is best to just keep going. She had put this strategy to the test a couple of months later. Jenna was performing in a different show and had some problems with her microphone, but instead of getting flustered, she covered it up beautifully. Making mistakes is part of growing up and how we handle them will help us grow. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

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making-mistakes

Tweens: At this age, kids tend to be more focused on “stuff,” so your focus should be on differentiating between basic needs (clothes, food) versus privileges that kids have to earn (designer coat, new video game). For example, if your child decides they want a new video game or a second pair of boots, jointly come up with a schedule of chores to earn money. You can also offer a weekly allowance that is contingent on household responsibilities. This basic process not only helps children be grateful for what they have, but also helps them develop an overall appreciation for all the work that enables them to live comfortably.

Teens: Keep the attitude of gratitude going by encouraging teens to come up with their own ways of expressing thanks. For example, they might post a photo of something they are grateful for daily on Instagram or write one note of gratitude a day in a journal. At this age, becoming involved in a cause or volunteer project is an ideal way for kids to turn their appreciation into action and experience how showing your gratitude can really make a big difference. See this kids story book on showing gratefulness.

See more tips on gratitude. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Keep on praising your child.

Gratitude

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